Sam Fender

Sam Fender performs at the Virgin Money Unity Arena on August 13, 2020 in Newcastle upon Tyne, England in what is the first performance at a socially distanced music venue.

On assignment for Getty Images Entertainment I was sent along to shoot a few from the gig…

Images (c) Ian Forsyth / Getty Images

See more of my work in my galleries & blog at Room 2850

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No usage without arrangement.

Beckett’s First Love

The Park Bench Theatre perform Samuel Beckett’s First Love during an open air play in a socially distanced covid secure space in Rowntree Park on August 12, 2020 in York, England.

As coronavirus lockdown restrictions are eased in many areas, the theatre and the arts sectors begin to re-start their businesses.

First Love is a short story by Samuel Beckett, written in 1946 and first published in its original French version in 1970 and, in Beckett’s English translation, in 1973.

The Park Bench Theatre season is being presented by Engine House Theatre.

Images (c) Ian Forsyth / Getty Images

See more of my work in my galleries & blog at Room 2850

All rights reserved.

No usage without arrangement.

The Laing

The Laing Art Gallery re-opens to the public on August 10, 2020 in Newcastle upon Tyne, England.

As Coronavirus pandemic lockdown closures are eased galleries begin to re-open around the country as they try and re-start their businesses.

The Laing Art Gallery opened in 1901 after funds to build the gallery were provided by Alexander Laing, a Newcastle businessman who had made his money from his wine and spirit shop and beer bottling business.

The gallery today is home to an internationally important collection of art, focusing on British oil paintings, watercolours, ceramics, silver and glassware.

Images (c) Ian Forsyth / Getty Images

See more of my work in my galleries & blog at Room 2850

All rights reserved.

No usage without arrangement.

Behind the Shot : The Drive-In

Sometimes a simple piece of equipment can lend itself to making a different shot from an unusual angle. In this Behind the Shot I’ll be looking at a simple but effective technique I used for this shot from a drive-in movie tour I covered that stopped off at a long-stay car park at Newcastle airport.

I wanted to get a wide picture of the cars all parked watching the large screen which was showing Jaws. With no high ground or chairs to use I thought about getting my step ladder which I always carry in the car but I was parked in a different area to where I was working so I opted to use my monopod.

The one I use is a great piece of kit. It’s the Velbon Ultra Stick Super 8.

A lightweight and compact 6-section monopod that collapses to 31.4cm and extends to 155cm. It sells for around £40-50 quid and can be picked up easily if you google it.

It’s a great piece of kit because it’s also really small and fits in the pocket/pouch quite easily so can be carried around without any issues.

I got it origionally to use with my Fuji kit that I used to have because that camera system is really light and didn’t strain this small monopod.

The Sony’s are heavier and I can certainly feel a little more ‘flex’ when the camera is attached and I hold it above my head for this kind of shot. But it still seems to be stable and safe enough to support the Sony A9ii and a 24mm without any issues.

The technique I use with this shot is simple enough. I attached the monopod (unextended) to the camera. I engage the self-timer function set to 10 seconds. I set the exposure I want based on the scene. I then pre-focus on a specific area, generally using an aperture of f5.6 or f8 and then I flick the lens to manual focus so the camera doesn’t try and re-focus on something else in the scene once I raise it up. I tilt out the rear screen before extending the monopod. Then I press the button and lift it up above me keeping an eye on the rear screen for composition.

This rear screen view from this distance doesn’t offer a great view and in bright sunlight it’s almost redundant but even if I get a general idea of what I’m after it’s better than nothing.

Then it’s simply a case of holding it still and keeping an eye on the screen to tweak composition until the timer runs down. Once I hear the click I lower it, have a chimp and see if it has worked as I wanted. If I need to do another shot then I’m all set so just press the button and lift it up and repeat.

All fairly simple stuff and hardly tasking but it’s quick and easy and more importantly quite effective. So when I have to file a varied set of pictures that depict an event then this is another shot that you can add to the set that gives an unusual viewpoint which is never a bad thing

You can also adapt this technique to other shots as well to give unusual viewpoints and it does work well for direct over head shots in the right situation.

Clearly it also works well in its standard use as a monopod and I’ve used it on my 100-400 f4-5.6 G Master lens and it supports it well. It can also be utilised as support for shooting video. While it can’t replace a decent tripod for stable shots at a push it works.

So there it is. A simple and effective way of adding another shot to the set that offers a different viewpoint from normal.

Images (c) Ian Forsyth / Getty Images

See more of my work in my galleries & blog at Room 2850

All rights reserved.

No usage without arrangement.