The 25th Hambleton Horse Show

The 25th Hambleton District Horse Show is being held this weekend at Sutton Park in the picturesque Yorkshire village of Sutton-On-The-Forest near York.

The show which was originally established 25 years ago at The Barugh, Carlton Husthwaite has now grown to be a show with over 200 classes of events with qualifiers over the years for shows such as Royal International Horse Show.

Run each year in aid of charities this year sees money raised going to Yorkshire Cancer Research, Yorkshire Air Ambulance and The Injured Jockeys Fund.

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Image (c) Ian Forsyth / Getty Images

See more of my work in my galleries & blog at Room 2850

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South Gare Project

Another trip down to the South Gare today offered a further opportunity to shoot a few photographs that I’ll consider adding to the project that I’ve been working on for a while.

You can see more from that project on South Gare here: South Gare Project

The idea for my project started almost by accident several years ago after going there to shoot pictures on some occasional news jobs and I found myself beginning to have quite an archive of pictures building up and so the idea of continuing to look at the area came about and I’ve been visiting the area on numerous occasions since.

The thing I now need to bring in are boundaries or an end point. As with many long-term photography projects boundaries should be put in place to mark an end otherwise they can go on and on and ultimately they might lose their direction.

So this is what I’m looking at doing now. I have a couple more areas I need to work on over the next visits primarily revolving around portraits and after that I think this particular chapter in the life of the Gare will have come to an end.

But you never know what might happen! Rumours at the Gare talk of South Tees Development Corporation plans to develop the area and worries are that significant changes may affect the area through that development so watch this space…this project might begin to turn another direction soon.

But for now and once I complete further portraits I need to try and do something with this collection. An exhibition? A book? I’m not sure as both are difficult to achieve and financially testing so I will have to look into it further.

But for now this set of pictures are from my most recent trip to this amazing and unusual place.

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Image (c) Ian Forsyth

See more of my work in my galleries & blog at Room 2850

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Nigel Farage in Newcastle

Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage visits Northumberland Street during a whistle stop UK tour on May 20, 2019 in Newcastle Upon Tyne, England.

The visit to Newcastle and other locations around the country comes ahead of the 2019 European elections in the United Kingdom which will take place on May 23.

The Brexit Party is a pro-Brexit Eurosceptic political party formed in 2019. Nigel Farage, the former leader of the U.K. Independence Party, is campaigning for the Brexit Party’s contest for this month’s European Parliament elections.

The Brexit Party is reported to be polling in front of Labour and the Conservatives for the European parliament elections.

During the visit a milk shake was thrown over Mr Farage as he walked around the town by Paul Crowther. Here’s a few from the day and I’ll be writing a post soon about my thoughts about the ‘shake’ incident…

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Image (c) Ian Forsyth / Getty Images

See more of my work in my galleries & blog at Room 2850

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Brexit Party

Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage goes walkabout around Sunderland City centre during a Brexit Party campaign visit before he went on to deliver a speech to a full house of supporters at Rainton Meadows Arena in Houghton le Spring during a rally.

The visit comes ahead of the European elections which are due to take place on May 23.

The Brexit Party is a pro-Brexit Eurosceptic political party formed in 2019. Nigel Farage, the former leader of the U.K. Independence Party, is campaigning for the Brexit Party’s contest for this month’s European Parliament elections. The Brexit Party is reported to be polling in front of Labour and the Conservatives for the European parliament elections.

He was joined by Ann Widdecombe and Brexit Party MEP candidate’s Brian Monteith, John Tennant and Richard Monaghan.

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Image (c) Ian Forsyth / Getty Images

See more of my work in my galleries & blog at Room 2850

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Behind the Shot – Park Rash Peloton

In these ‘Behind the Shot‘ posts I take one of the pictures I shot from an event and go into a little more detail about how I got the shot and what the thought process might have been in the build up to taking it as well as some of the more technical aspects of taking the picture and what went right or what went wrong.

The shot below was a shot I took of the Tour de Yorkshire Peloton climbing the Cote de Park Rash ascent on Stage 4 of the race.

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The Park Rash ascent climbs for a little over 2 kilometres out of the village of Kettlewell in North Yorkshire gaining 230 metres in height over that length. The most interesting feature of this climb in my opinion is the first tight hairpin bend about a third of the way up the hill where the gradient reaches 25% at the hairpin.

Positioning myself on the hairpin I knew that if I could get back enough and get high enough then I would get the full hairpin in the frame with cheering crowds either side of the road and with a large peloton filling the road it could look quite dramatic. If the race helicopter happened to be around at the same time then that would be a bonus.

Shooting with the Fuji X series cameras (X Pro 2 in this case) the user has an option to fire the camera remotely from an app on the phone. The app allows you to view on your phone what your lens is seeing and exposure adjustments can be made so my plan ‘A’ was to cover the race for as long as I could on a longer lens and camera before swapping to my wide lens on the other camera that was placed on a monopod that I would then lift up high above me and fire the camera using the app.

With me so far…? Ok, so after numerous test shots as I waited – including the one below taken as we were all waiting for the riders to arrive – it looked like a good plan and the view I was able to get was really good so I was looking forward to trying for the shot once the crowds built and once the riders arrived.

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As with these things I like to have a plan ‘A’ but I also like to have a Plan ‘B’ and ‘C’…just in case. Probably a plan ‘D’ also because once things start happening if something goes wrong then there isn’t usually time to re-assess the whole thing so you need to have something in place already so you can immediately switch to it.

Cycling is a good example of the fleeting nature of some subjects because the peloton passes so quickly – even if they are climbing up a steep hill – and once they’re gone…they’re gone. So it’s one go at it.

Having tried this approach before on other jobs I was concerned that I would either lose my already dodgy connection between the camera and the phone app which was dropping in and out on the remote hillside or that it might freeze out while it was open and in my pocket because I wouldn’t have time to take the phone out and open the app and connect as it would take too long so it needed to be left ‘on’ and if it froze while I was shooting the approaching peloton in the meantime then it would make it unusable when the time came.

Unfortunately in this case this is what happened. As I finished shooting the riders approaching through the valley to the bottom of the climb and beginning their climb I switched to my wide lens on the monopod and looking at the app I saw ‘connection is lost’ written across the app. So my plan ‘A’ was scuppered!

Whilst muttering some very choice words to myself I immediately moved a little over to my right where I had seen earlier that there was a rock and standing on that I shot what is commonly known as a ‘Hail Mary’!

This is essentially raising the camera up as high as you can above your head and whilst pointing in the general direction you shoot your pictures without really knowing how it will be composed. It’s all bit hit and miss but with knowledge of the angle of view the lens covers and knowing the exposure and settings you need the odds head a little more in your favour and in this case I’d had more than enough time to work it all out in advance.

This shot was the result. It isn’t as wide as my initial planned shot would have been where as you can see in the test shot all the hairpin can be seen in its entirety but it still works I think and tells the story of a difficult hillclimb, a busy peloton of riders, enthusiastic crowds and it puts it right into the amazing countryside of North Yorkshire – and my helicopter even made an appearance!

This is just one way of doing it of course. I could have shot it in a few different ways and using a stepladder would’ve been a good option and that was one which was employed by a couple of colleagues including Simon Hulme from the Yorkshire Post who was also shooting from the same place but I really wanted to try to make the monopod shot work just to try and get a different view from as even higher viewpoint.

Sometimes that works and sometimes it doesn’t but it’s worth a shot as long as you know you can get something even if the initial plan falls apart.

So all been said I’m happy. Well reasonably happy…photographers are ever totally happy of course but it makes a decent picture.

Kit used: Two Fuji X Pro 2 bodies, 50-140mm f2.8 lens, 10-24mm f4 lens, Velbon Super 8 ‘Ultra Stick’ monopod.

 

Image (c) Ian Forsyth / Getty Images

See more of my work in my galleries & blog at Room 2850

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Tour de Yorkshire 2019

The Tour of Yorkshire returned to the county for the fifth year with a four stage men’s race over four days covering 384 miles and a two stage women’s race over two days covering 164 miles.

The course takes in 150 villages, towns and cities throughout Yorkshire. Chris Lawless riding for Team Ineos became the first Briton to win the men’s Tour de Yorkshire whilst Netherlands rider Marianne Vos claimed overall victory in the women’s Tour de Yorkshire.

I covered part of stage two of the women’s race and part of the third stage of the men’s race on one day deciding to head to Sandsend near Whitby before heading into the Yorkshire Dales the following day for the fourth and final stage of the men’s race.

It was the first time that the tour had added Lythe Bank into the route and whilst it didn’t attract the crowds of other better known climbs it was worth a look to catch the action as the women’s peloton came through.

Ahead of the men’s race coming through I then headed back down the bank to the seafront at Sandsend. Seeing the day before that there was a big swell with strong northerly winds pushing and also that the peloton was due to pass through at around the time of high tide I was hoping that I might be able to get a decent shot of the peloton with waves crashing behind them.

At least that was the plan! It didn’t quite come off that way unfortunately and as the four shot sequence will illustrate further down I did get my wave but not quite at the time the peloton arrived! But it was worth a go to try and get something different and the Sunday Telegraph and Cycling Weekly ran some pictures from the day.

 

Stage 2 Women’s Race & Stage 3 Men’s Race – Sandsend

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The following day I drove out into the beautiful countryside of the Yorkshire Dales to cover the fourth and final stage of the men’s race as they reached the third of five classified climbs on that stage and headed up the Cote Park Rash.

The crowds were bigger here with cycling enthusiasts and spectators making their way on foot or by bike the couple of miles along the winding road from the picturesque village of Kettlewell.

The main spot on this hill for a good picture is the tight hairpin bend about a third of the way up the hill. That’s where I situated myself with a plan in place to get a dramatic picture as the peloton passed by.

It also offered a good opportunity to shoot crowd shots and fans waiting on the hillside and with everyone in good spirits it was one of the more enjoyable events to cover.

Stage 4 – Cote Park Rash

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Images (c) Ian Forsyth / Getty Images

See more of my work in my galleries & blog at Room 2850

Prints are available to buy through the secure online ordering process.

All rights reserved.

No usage without arrangement.